Last of the roses…

…to be glazed (leaded-up) and the last of the six figurative panels too. Such an enormous amount of work and so rewarding to see the window finally coming together.

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Notice the five panels on the easel beyond. I love the way they look at night, showing the pattern of the leads.

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Still working… into the night!

Holy Family

Here’s the Holy Family panel coming together…

IMG_2636…and a few more photos of work-in-progress

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Flipping the first panel…

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Yes! I’ve just finished soldering the first side of the first panel for Trinity Episcopal. Here it is face down on the bench, flipped over ready to solder the back. I always love seeing the reverse of a panel, all shiny and neat, and to glimpse the finished window for the first time. It’s a whole new viewpoint!

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…and it’s surprisingly rigid for a half-soldered window..

glazing3Marching onward! Eight more panels to glaze, putty, and install before winter

Glasspainting complete!

Thanks to Rev Sharon Gracen and Sandy Baldwin from Trinity Episcopal for bringing such enthusiasm to my studio on Wednesday as I finalized the glasspainting. Now a new set of skills come into play as I start leading up… each of these 1,200-odd pieces of hand-painted glass need to be fixed together to create a single 10.5ft stained glass window.

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No more amateur videos for now, instead watch (or re-watch) Menfolk Part 2 to see how I remove glass from the easel, chip off beeswax, fire the kiln and walk the dog!

Above, I’ve started to assemble the first panel. I’m so happy to be here!

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Glasspainting at the easel (videos)

IMG_2609As promised,  here’s a little insight into my wet matting technique. Propylene glycol allows the glasspaint to remain wet (“open”) for much longer than a traditional mix, so I can create graduated shadows while the paint is still wet. I can also leave some areas of the glass completely clear to maintain the sparkle. Watch me apply and manipulate a wet matter in real time in this two minute video  Glass Painting at the Easel Part 1 and brush back the dry matte to remove highlights in Glasspainting at the Easel Part 2 (2.5 mins).

I am painting glass that has been previously painted, fired and fixed onto clear glass easel plates with a mixture of beeswax and rosin (how this is done). Working at the easel with my painted glass up against natural light (not on a light table) allows me to manipulate the transparency/opacity of each piece, add final shadows, and see the window as a whole.

Easel painting prep

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Today I fixed all the little pieces of painted glass back onto clear glass easel plates with a mixture of beeswax and rosin ready for final glasspainting up against the daylight. This is where I add any final shading and adjust transparency where needed.

We made two very quick videos of the process for all those stained glass technique junkies….
waxing up a panel (68 seconds) and
putting the glass back onto the easel (22 seconds)

Here’s another panel, partly laid out on a glass easel plate prior to waxing up.

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I have to end with a more interesting photo because I never know whether Facebook will choose my first or my last photo to post to my Page. If there’s anyone out there who can tell me how to control this please do!

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Another milestone…

Glasspainting on the lightbox is now complete. Hurrah! Here’s one of the last panels I finished, with the little girl in her blue dress. You can check back and see some photos of her at an earlier stage with just tracelines and one layer of matte.
Connie, ready to lead up