A stained glass plank for Jason Middlebrook

tree(cottonwood)DETAIL

Another artist collaboration to keep me on my toes: making a stained glass plank (yes, that’s a length-wise cross-sectional slab of tree) for Jason Middlebrook. He’s been working on a series of very lovely, abstract, painted wood planks for several years, and recently started to work in different media, including concrete, bronze and now, stained glass.

As a test, I cut up an old stained glass window to see if I could give it some depth and texture to look like tree bark. Crumpled, soldered copper foil over a sturdy mosaic of mirror eventually did the job quite well.

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Jason loved the sample, and turned up at my studio soon after with a beautiful cottonwood plank almost 9ft tall that was to be our model, the specific plank I would be re-creating.

tree(cottonwood)

My first drawing shows the place where the cross-section of the inner bark meets the wood proper. It’s a smooth darker area that’s flush with the surface of the plank. A welded steel armature will follow the bumps and curves of this line.

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Then I made a wax rubbing of the edge of the plank where the bark begins to slope away.

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I set Jason up with some narrow strips of black masking tape and he started drawing out the major breaks.

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Here’s the partially completed cartoon (there will be a lot more linework) and the cutlines. Jason Middlebrook’s exhibition at MASS MoCA is up for another week (’til April 6th) and well worth a visit.

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4 thoughts on “A stained glass plank for Jason Middlebrook

  1. Debora this new project with Jason is
    cutting-edge art! šŸ˜‰ It’s creative, amazing, original; and it will be beautiful. I love the endless possibilities and the creativity divine. God bless. Have fun.

  2. Pingback: Check, Check…..And Check Again | Say It With A Camera

  3. Pingback: Armature for a Plank | Inside the stained glass studio

  4. Pingback: Open Studio Friday, Sept 5th 4-6pm | Inside the stained glass studio

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